Saudi judicial system to introduce alternative punishments soon

Abu Dhabi: TheSaudi judicial system will soon introduce alternative punishments, which include social work for prisoners convicted of minor crimes instead of making them serve prison time, local media reported.

###

Convicts who are sentenced to alternative punishments will be made to wear electronic bracelets so that prison authorities can follow up their movements and know their whereabouts, Saudi Attorney General, Sheikh Saud bin Abdullah Al Muajab, said.

###

See also

  • Saudi Arabia: Copper thieves arrested by cops

  • 600,000 government employees in Saudi Arabia return to offices

  • Three Saudis arrested for tampering with speed radar

  • Saudi Arabia: Sex harassment penalty irreversible

###

Al Muajab added substitute punishments will benefit the individual, society and the country at large.

###

The alternative punishment calls for applying electronic monitoring for prisoners who go out on parole to spend the Eid holidays with the families or to attend events such as weddings and funerals.

###

Those who are imprisoned for failing to honour financial commitments are the most worthy of alternative punishments, the chief said.

Click Here: All Blacks Rugby Jersey###

The initiative is also supported by the ministries of interior, labour and social development, justice and the Public Prosecution.

###

Okaz reviewed a series of the first alternative penalties handed down by Saudi courts more than 12 years ago.

###

A Taif court ruled that an employee who assaulted a citizen work for eight months without a vacation.

###

A similar ruling was handed down by a judge against an intermediate school student, who beat and stabbed a young man. The convict was sentenced to work in construction through Al Ber Charity Society for a five hours per day, all through the academic year, provided that this does not conflict with his studies, in exchange for 50 riyals a day. The young man was also obliged to attend educational meetings at the association for a period of 3 hours at intervals, and in the event that he violated one of the provisions, he would be re-tried.

###

In 2009, the Turba Governorate Court ruled a man to care for his blind, sick mother, and attend daily at the Turba Police Station to be monitored on an ongoing basis by the court.

###

The Morning and Evening Brief

Leave A Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *